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Vaccines and Allergies

 
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Do vaccines cause asthma or allergies?

Several large studies have investigated the relationship between vaccines and allergies.

One well-controlled study was performed using the computerized records of children born between 1991 and 1997 who were enrolled in four large health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States. Researchers identified 18,407 children with asthma. The risk for asthma was not greater in children who received diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine, oral polio vaccine, measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine or hepatitis B vaccine compared with children who did not receive these vaccines.

Another large well-controlled study in Sweden prospectively evaluated the risk of allergies following receipt of the pertussis vaccine in 669 children. Infants were randomized to receive one of three different diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine or a control vaccine that did not contain pertussis beginning at 2 months of age. Children were followed for about two and a half years and the risk of allergies was determined by parent questionnaires and examination of medical records. Allergic disorders studied included asthma, skin reactions, hay fever, hives and food allergies. No differences in the incidence of allergic diseases were observed in children who did or did not receive pertussis vaccine. Of interest, children with natural pertussis infections were more likely to develop allergic diseases than children not infected with pertussis.

Finally, a population-based cohort study in Australia followed 5,500 patients from ages 7 to 44 years. Investigators looked for associations between receipt of vaccines and asthma, eczema, food allergies or hay fever. No association was found between the receipt of childhood vaccines (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and smallpox) and any of these conditions.

 

  Immunisation and allergy in children and adults: A case-based approach

Case 6: Kostas

Kostas, aged 24 years, presented for an influenza vaccination, which had been recommended due to his asthma. His medical history included an egg allergy with previous anaphylaxis. Kostas had not received the influenza immunisation previously, and his general practitioner was concerned about administering it in the primary care setting.


The current influenza vaccines in Australia are derived from influenza virus grown in hens’ eggs and may potentially contain minute traces of egg protein (ovalbumin). There have been previous case reports of anaphylaxis to influenza vaccine in individuals with egg allergies;14 however, this was when the amounts of egg protein were much higher than in current vaccines.

In a review of influenza immunisation and egg allergy, there were no severe reactions after the immunisation.15 Mild side effects such as local itch, urticaria, throat irritation, wheeze or abdominal pain have been observed, but not anaphylaxis. There was also no correlation between preceding allergy testing with the vaccine and the outcome of adverse reaction.16 Current international guidelines, including those published by the Australian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA),14

  Allergic Reactions after COVID-19 VaccinationScreenshot 7cdcvbn

 
 

If You Are Having a Severe Allergic Reaction to a COVID-19 Vaccine

Severe allergic reactions to vaccines are rare but can happen. If you get a COVID-19 vaccine and you think you might be having a severe allergic reaction after leaving the vaccination provider site, seek immediate medical care by calling 911.

A severe allergic reaction can cause:

  • difficulty breathing or wheezing,
  • a drop in blood pressure,
  • swelling of the tongue or throat, or
  • a generalized rash or hives, which may include mucus membranes.

If You Had a Rash on the Arm where You Got a COVID-19 Shot

If you had a red, itchy, swollen, or painful rash where you got a COVID-19 shot, you should still get another shot at the scheduled date and time. This applies to second, additional, or booster shots. Your vaccination provider may recommend that you get your next COVID-19 vaccine in the opposite arm, if possible.

These rashes can start a few days to more than a week after your shot and are sometimes quite large. These rashes are also known as “COVID arm.” Tell your vaccination provider that you experienced a rash or “COVID arm” after your shot. Your vaccination provider may recommend that you get your next COVID-19 vaccine in the opposite arm if possible.

If the rash is itchy, you can take an antihistamine. If it is painful, you can take a pain medication like acetaminophen or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

  Shingles vaccine side effects

Shingles vaccine side effects

Like all vaccines, the shingles vaccines (Zostavax and Shingrix) can cause side effects, but they're generally mild and do not last long.

Common side effects that occur in at least 1 in 10 people are:

  • headache
  • redness, pain, swelling, itching and warmth at the injection site
  • fatigue

If any side effects carry on for longer than a few days, speak to your GP or practice nurse.

Tell your GP if you develop a rash after having the shingles vaccination.

Catching chickenpox from the shingles vaccine

Very occasionally, a person has developed chickenpox following shingles vaccination (fewer than 1 in 10,000 individuals).

Allergic reaction to shingles vaccination

There is a very small chance of a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to the shingles vaccine, as there is with other vaccines.

Anaphylaxis is very serious and potentially life-threatening, but it can be treated. All healthcare staff that deliver vaccinations are trained in this. With prompt treatment, people fully recover from anaphylaxis.

Monitoring the safety and side

 

  Who can have the shingles vaccine?

You're eligible for the shingles vaccine when you're aged 70 to 79.

When you're eligible, you can have the shingles vaccination at any time of year.

The shingles vaccine is not available on the NHS to anyone aged 80 and over because it seems to be less effective in this age group.

Australian Vaccines

  Vaccine history timeline

 

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A history of Adolescent school -bAsedvAccinAtion in AustrAliA

 Pre-1970s
One of the earliest recorded national school-based
vaccination programs in Australia provided the
diphtheria–tetanus toxoid (dT) vaccine from 1932
to 1936.11 This was followed by the introduction of
the bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, deliv-
ered through schools in some jurisdictions from
the late 1940s to the mid-1980s. The Northern
Territory was the only jurisdiction to continue rou-
tinely offering this until 1990 (Table 1).12,13 Some
states and territories also used schools to deliver
polio vaccine during the 1950s and 1960s as part of
larger mass vaccination programs.

QLD Health

  School Immunisation Program

 

  A short history of vaccination campaigns in Australia and what we might expect with COVID-19

We can trace school-based vaccination programs in Australia back to the early 1930s, when diphtheria vaccination campaigns began, followed by the first mass childhood vaccination campaigns against whooping cough in the early 1940s.

Mass vaccination programs again polio began in 1956 and were so "spectacularly successful … polio had been virtually eliminated from Australia" by 1966, write researchers in a 2001 Medical Journal of Australia article. A schoolgirl rubella vaccination program began in 1971.

 /www.herpes.org.nz

 /www.herpes.org.nz

 
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Shingles vaccine side effects

Like all vaccines, the shingles vaccines (Zostavax and Shingrix) can cause side effects, but they're generally mild and do not last long.

Common side effects that occur in at least 1 in 10 people are:

  • headache
  • redness, pain, swelling, itching and warmth at the injection site
  • fatigue

If any side effects carry on for longer than a few days, speak to your GP or practice nurse.

Tell your GP if you develop a rash after having the shingles vaccination.

Catching chickenpox from the shingles vaccine

Very occasionally, a person has developed chickenpox following shingles vaccination (fewer than 1 in 10,000 individuals).

Allergic reaction to shingles vaccination

There is a very small chance of a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to the shingles vaccine, as there is with other vaccines.

Anaphylaxis is very serious and potentially life-threatening, but it can be treated. All healthcare staff that deliver vaccinations are trained in this. With prompt treatment, people fully recover from anaphylaxis.

Monitoring the safety and side

 
 
 
 
 
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 Last week, at a dinner event in Manhattan, the Democratic primary candidate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. shared his unvarnished thoughts about the nature of the coronavirus. “There’s an argument that it is ethnically targeted,” he explained, in remarks captured on video. “COVID-19 is targeted to attack Caucasians and Black people. The people who are most immune are Ashkenazi Jews and Chinese.” To be sure, Kennedy added, “we don’t know whether it was deliberately targeted or not.” In other words, Kennedy apparently believes it is an open question whether the pandemic was engineered by a shadowy cabal to spare Chinese and Jewish people.
 
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Jerusalem Post Admits jews Are Behind Coronavirus Vaccines

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Jerusalem Post Admits jews Are Behind Coronavirus Vaccines

Jerusalem Post Admits jews Are Behind Coronavirus Vaccines

Jerusalem Post Admits jews Are Behind Coronavirus Vaccines

One can’t escape their presence in the forefront of leading companies in the race to find a vaccine that will prevent coronavirus.” – Jerusalem Post

Of course the Jerusalem Post is trying to make it seem like a good thing that a bunch of jewish supremacists are behind the development of vaccines that will put neurotoxins into people and change their genetic structure. I guess we should be saying, Thanks jews!

Greer Fay Cashman starts out the article by explaining how jews are almost always at the top of any field, even though they are such a small part of the world population.

The individual does not necessarily represent the pack, but when the individual achieves fame or notoriety, he or she is immediately associated for good and for bad by friend and foe with the country or faith into which he or she was born. This is particularly so in the case of Jews, who, after all is said and done, represent a minuscule percentage of the world’s population. Nonetheless, it is amazing how many accomplished individuals there have been, in any number of fields, whose biographical details, as published by Wikipedia, include mention of the fact that he or she was born into a Jewish family. There are far fewer references to someone being born Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, Episcopalian, Catholic, Protestant, Anglican, Mormon, etc., although given their political clout, there is increasing mention of Evangelicals.

Of course when we are dealing with the field of “medicine” (poison) we are bound to find an extremely high number of jews.

Getting back to singling out Jews, one can’t escape their presence in the forefront of leading companies in the race to find a vaccine that will prevent coronavirus.

The article goes on to mention only Albert Bourla, who heads Pfizer, and Dr. Tal Zaks, who is Moderna’s chief medical officer, and how they have been attacked by “anti-semites,” but there are many more jews Cashman could have mentioned.

For example, Michael Dolsten is the chief scientist at Pfizer, who is leading the company’s vaccine charge. He said, “There has been a strong Jewish tradition around contributing to humanity and a strong tradition within medicine.” He also said that he hope hopes the US stays a “melting pot,” which itself was a genocidal concept cooked up by jew Israel Zangwill.

Pfizer and Moderna received $1.95 and $2.5 billion respectively through Trump’s Operation Warp Speed, and soon they will be seeking emergency use approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) after they cooked their books about the safety and efficacy of their vaccines.

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, whose maternal grandmother was a jew (which would make his mother and himself a jew as well), has said that a vaccine will go first to “wherever it’s going to add the most value according to the data and the science and the recommendations of our experts.” Just trust the experts, goyim!

If you value the health and safety of yourself and your loved ones, you will stay as far away from this jewish vaccine as possible!



Jews Run the CDC Centers for Disease Control

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Walensky is married to Loren D. Walensky, also a physician-scientist. They have three sons. They are Jewish and members of Temple Emanuel in Newton, Massachusetts.
Vzdělání: Washington University (BA); Johns ...
Narození: Rochelle Paula Bersoff; April 5, 1969 (age ...
Ředitel: Joe Biden

Rochelle Walensky - Wikipedia

" Rochelle P. Walensky, MD, MPH, is the 19th Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the ninth Administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry."

Dr. Rochelle Walensky takes over at CDC – The Forward

https://forward.com › news › dr-roc...
 
9. 2. 2021 — Walensky is “a tireless champion of the core Jewish value of pikuach nefesh, saving life,” said Rabbi Michelle Robinson of Temple Emanuel...
 
 
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MRDETROIT76
I have to admit I didnt believe the jews did it or were behind everything bad until i saw I POTS series. he details everything with proof that i was able to verify. the jews really r behind all the bs. its really true. By the way I was a jew not anymore.
 
TonySopran0
I think Jews tend to vote Democrat, purely because they swallowed the same BS, white liberals believe. They believe they are “helping the poor”, by voting Democrat, and charity is a very important value in Judaism, similar to how Christians believe in helping the poor, but what they are really doing, by voting Democrat, is costing themselves more money in the long run. Jews tend to make more money then non Jews, let’s just be honest, and they tend to live in higher taxed states like New York, New Jersey, Illinois, etc. What they really do, by voting Democrat, is basically, unknowingly give the democrat party, as well as the government more of the money, they rightfully earned, and they end up keeping less of it. Blacks and Hispanics tend to vote Democrat more as well, but for completely different reasons. For them it’s for their own self interest, basically for more free welfare and government money. People need to run, not walk, from the Democrat party, no matter your fait
 
 
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Laura Lomer Is Jewish person who is exposing Jews behind House bill 269 seeks to curb free speech
 
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 Alex Jones presents video footage from an interview with the Prime Minister of Israel, Benjamin Netanyahu, where he admits that an agreement was made with Pfizer to use the Israeli people as test subjects for their new COVID vaccine.
 
 
 
 
 

You can read the full letter at AmericasFrontlineDoctors.org.

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WARNING!! From an Unvaccinated Person in Israel.

WARNING!! From an Unvaccinated Person in Israel

The Testimonies Project

The Testimonies Project

Jewish testimonies about Covid jab results.  The testimonies project - the mo...

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Is This An Ancient Archeological Treasure Trove Or An Elaborate Hoax? | Time Team | Odyssey

 

Read 2386 times Last modified on Saturday, 26 August 2023 08:38